Philosophy of Martin Luther King

•March 30, 2011 • Leave a Comment

Martin Luther King had a greater philosophy in life because he promoted equality without the use of violence, Malcolm X promoted violence. When you fight violence with more violence it doesnt solve anything. Malcolm X’s supporters thought that violence was okay; if you promote violence then you aren’t acting any better then anyone else, and not everyone will be following you because they agree with your teachings, they just agree with not getting hurt. Malcolm X promoted his ideas the same way that the KKK did, but not to as such as harsh an extent as the examples they used. Malcolm X wasn’t pushing for the same ideas as Martin Luther King. Martin Luther King wanted to abolish segregation and make everyone equal, Malcolm X wanted equality, but he still wanted the different races to be segregated. If the races continued to be segregated then you cannot teach the theory that everyone is equal if there are signs up saying no whites allowed or no blacks allowed. Malcolm X’s philosophy wasn’t the best for America; Martin Luther King helped more in the long run and was a brave man who would go to any extent to get his idea across the board, he was the greater opponent and had a better philosophy for America in the 1930′s.

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The Treaty of Versailles

•March 30, 2011 • Leave a Comment
If the treaty of Versailles had been more lenient towards Germany, Hitler still would have risen to power. There still would have been substantial amounts of poverty in the country, and many people who still would have believed in Adolf’s teachings. Hitler was an extremely influential person, and it wouldn’t have mattered if the treaty had been more lenient or not. Other people and Adolf were heartless enough to kill people’s dreams, future, families, and their own lives; those same people wouldn’t have cared what kind of economical state that Germany was in; they would have twisted how things were to fit to their advantage so Hitler could still have risen to power. Times would still have been hard, money still would have been paid and citizens would still have wanted to look up to a powerful leader with strong ambitions who sounded like they knew what was best for the world. Hitler was so influential tha t the loosening of the harshness of the treaty would not have mattered. World War II still would have occurred too, because hitler still would have risen, and now Germany would have had more economic power and they would have still been able to influence other countries to do their bidding; they would have had even more reason to do what they had done. In conclusion, if the treaty of Versailles had lessened the harshness of Germany’s punishment, it would not have made a difference because Hitler still would have risen and World War II still would have occurred.
 
 
 

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Franklin D. Roosevelt

•March 18, 2011 • Leave a Comment

FDR

On January 30, 1882 Franklin Delano Roosevelt was born in Hudson Valley, New York to James Roosevelt and Sara Ann Delano; he was their only child. As a teenager, Roosevelt played many sports including golf, polo. lawn tennis, and he also learned how to row and shoot guns. At Groton School, the headmaster Endicott Peabody, heavily influenced his students by teaching them that Christians should help the less fortunate and he urged many of them to help the homeless and less fortunate, Endicott greatly influenced Franklin and this could be why he was such the giving man that he was. In 1904 FDR joined the graduating class from Harvard and while attending the school, his cousin Thodore Roosevelt got elected into the President’s office. The way that he conducted his ethics, and the way he acted also influenced Franklin, and in 1902 he met Eleanor Roosevelt, who would three years later become his wife. The same year that he graduated, he enrolled and entered himself into Columbia Law School but three years later dropped out because he had passed The New York Bar Exam. In 1908 he took up a job at a Wall Street firm who involved themselves with corporate law; on October 11, 1911 FDR became initiated into the freemasonry. Between the years of 1906 and 1916, FDR and Eleanor were gifted with six beautiful children: Anna Eleanor, James, Franklin Delano Jr., Elliot, Franklin Delano Jr. II, and John Aspinwall. All four sons became World War II veterans and were all decorated for bravery, two of these sons were elected for the House of Representative’s. In 1910, FDR ran for New York State Senate, he soon became an extremely popular figure among many New York Democrats. In 1912 he was reelected but resigned one year later to take up his new position of Assistant U.S. Secretary to the Navy. In 1920, Franklin resigned from that job to to begin running for Vice President, and although he lost the election and returned to his law firm, he wsould soon be back up and running. In 1920 while on vacation, Roosevelt contracted polio and became paralyzed from the waist down. From then on he tried many treatments and put iron braces on his legs and would force himself to walk; hewould always be seen standing up, being aided by someone, or standing at an angle, the only time that he would be seen in a wheelchair would be when he was at home alone. In 1924, four years after becoming paralyzed, he became New York State Governor. In 1930, he was reelected as governor for a second time. Two years later, he became President of the United States; he was in office from the years 1933-1945. When he took office, two million people were homeless, one-fourth of the workforce was unemployed, prices had fallen by 60%, and it was the time of the worst depression in history. Roosevelt’s solution has been defined as relief, recovery, and reform; he wanted relief ofr the unemployed, reform for long term things that were wrong, and lastly, recovery for the economy.

Before Death

From the time he was in office, he was able to accomplish all of this and more. After being elected into office for a third time, a law was passed stating that a President was only allowed to reside in office for two terms. On April 12, 1945 Roosevelt complained of a tremendous pain in the back of his head, shortly afterwards he slumped forward unconscious, he had suffered a massive stroke. He died at 3:35 pm that day. FDR was in office for twelve years, he helped the defeat of Nazi Germany, and he helped defeat Japan after Pearl Harbor too. He was a giving, thoughtful man who believed in helping others ansd trying to raise the United States to the power that it is today and to help unite other countries. Franklin Delano Roosevelt has become an icon around the world, and if it was not for this great man, who knows where the world would be today? We are in debt to the impressive, intellectual FDR.

If FDR had not been elected into office, would America have ever been pulled out of it’s Depression and become the country that it has become today?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:FDR_speech.ogg 

www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/franklindroosevelt

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Poll

•February 28, 2011 • Leave a Comment

Trench Warfare of WWI

•February 28, 2011 • Leave a Comment

If you had been able to fly over the battlegrounds and regions that had been in use during World War One, it is very probable that you would have seen a series of maze-like dugouts in the ground. These maze-like structures were called trenches, and were more commonly used by the fronts fighting in the war. It consisted of soldiers possessing shovels and other various digging tools, and digging into the ground to make a cover for their armies; if shots were fired they could go over the entrenchments dug into the ground instead of maiming or wounding the soldiers. Members of a sentry would keep watch while others would sleep, and it would be continuous throughtout the nights and days, plans for trenches were highly elaborate. Over months and long periods of times, they would grow deeper and more complex; running into itself and becoming vast interlocking defensive mechanisms, to protect themselves from attack the surrounding areas would be covered in barbed wire as to prevent opposing soldiers from launching an attack. The spaces between trenches from opposite sides were knoen as “no-man’s land” and could be anywhere from a mere 16 yards to over 300. Each side though made their trenches from very different blueprints; British armies would more commonly dig out three parallell lines and between them connect them using communication trenches that were often heavily fortifies with neseccities. The front trench consisted of light and sparse forces, and the last trench was in use in case the front lines in the trenches were used; the last trench would be where you would often find mass counter-attacks. Geman forces constructed their battlements in a very different kind of style, they would build numbers of multiple redundant trench systems, and built their battlements so that breakthroughs from opposing forces were almost virtually impossible. They used materials like concrete, to help ventilate and reinforce the trences. Throughout the war, both sides evolved the process in which they reinforces themselves and their trenches from opposing forces. But, these processes were often dangerous, and there were threats from soldier’s very own living establishments concocted inside these elaborate trenches, and so the question remains: Was there more of a threat from dying from enemy weapons and soldiers from opposing trenches, or more so from your very own trench; where diseases ran rampant like trench foot, and dysentary, and filth, infection, and rats could kill you in a matter of days, in places where there was no threat of being killed by your enemies? http://www.firstworldwar.com/features/trenchlife.htm

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The Sinking of Lusitania

•February 28, 2011 • Leave a Comment

The Lusitania, the British passenger ship that was known in its day as the Greyhound of the Seas, was famous for its accommodations and speed, her engines produced 68,000 horsepower and moved the ship at a speed of 25 knots, a unit of speed that is equivalent to one mile per hour. In 1915 on May 1st, the Lusitania left from New York to voyage to Liverpool, a trip that would take the ship across the Atlantic.  On the ship were 1,959 passengers, 1800 of them being non-American citizens. Near one o’ clock, a torpedo was fired by a U-20 German submarine; it hit the ship and set off an explosion, and an unknown second one. Many passengers did not know that the ship’s cargo was all ammunition and designed contraband for British warfare. In eighteen minutes, the sunk had ship, bringing down and killing almost 1,200 people. Baskets holding infants and babies from the ship’s nursery was found floating on top of the water. It was a great tragedy to the world and enraged the American population. Was the sinking of the Lusitania worse than the sinking of the Titanic, a ship that killed over 1,500 of its passengers? http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/snpwwi2.htm

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